Tag Archives: signal and noise

The man who mistook his wife for an actual change in performance

There was once a man who mistook his wife for a hat. This is his wife. This is a hat. He thought Why did he think that? He had a brain injury. The injury affected the way his brain processed … Continue reading

Posted in data, experiment, measures, systems thinking | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

There are only 6 graphs you’ll ever see on a performance report and they’re all rubbish. Here they are.

This is Performance Cat, and she doesn’t like rubbish performance reporting. And she definitely doesn’t like dumbass explanations for meaningless shapes in graphs… One of the more adorable features of performance reporting in normal ordinary command and control organisations is … Continue reading

Posted in data, information, leadership, questions, setting a numerical target is like..., statistics, systems thinking | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

There really is only one test!

Attention performance people! Attention people who use numbers for performance! That’s you! You have one job! One job only! The purpose of your job, listen up, here it is, I’m about to tell you….it is to find out… “Is the … Continue reading

Posted in statistics, systems thinking, very short posts | Tagged , | 2 Comments

The Curious Case Of The Chart That Didn’t Bark In The Night

“Why has this performance indicator gone down three months in a row?” Regular readers of this blog will know the answer to this question already, without any knowledge of the indicator in question, or the work being measured. “It’s probably … Continue reading

Posted in data, statistics, systems thinking | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

The house that looks like Hitler

Remember the house that looks like Hitler? Course you do, it’s a house that looks like Hitler. What’s to forget? There’s loads of things that look like faces. There is the tampon machine that just loves checkin’ the ladies out… … Continue reading

Posted in human brains are weird, information, psychology, statistics, systems thinking | Tagged , , | 2 Comments