Twerking or working?

Rule 1: Twerking is not the same as working!

If you worked here how could you know what “work” actually was? You’ve only seen twerking.

If you work in a place where you get your purpose from the mouth of a manager, then it may as well be twerking rather than working.
In places like that purpose is as manager says.

Imagine transferring a customer rather than deal with their problem because you are going over the targetted call handling time? That’s not an approach that could come from reality, that is Twerking through and through. It can only come from the mind of a manager somewhere, and hence it was so.
These examples of Twerking masquerade as work and people don’t laugh. How to spot the Twerk within the work? Simply add Twerk onto the end!

  • We have made a strategic decision” TO TWERK!
Capture

“We carried out a PESTLE and a SWOT analysis and Twerking was really the only viable option”

  • What I want you to do is” TWERK
Capture

“If we map our Service objectives to the Corporate strategic priorities, I think you’ll find that Twerking clearly is the best fit with our approach to milk-aisle booty-shaking”

  • I’ve got a great idea, I want us all to start” TWERKING
twerk

“If we WERE to stop Twerking, what on earth would we do? Just STOP twerking? That is not a solution. WE TWERK OR WE ARE NOTHING”

Rule 2: You find out what your work is from reality, not from what somebody says it is.

But if you are in a place where purpose is discovered by finding out from reality what you should be doing, finding out what problem a customer has and then helping them solve it… then you’re much less likely to end up doing really silly things. Silly things involving filling in pieces of paper or going on an away day visioning smorgasbord. Silly things that do not help anybody.

Instead you’ll do what work actually is, helping somebody.

Capture

This is rarely work

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in clarity of purpose, command and control, human brains are weird, leadership, public sector, purpose, systems thinking and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s