A circular argument

 “The thing is when you start looking at the work, you see that the measures don’t tell you anything about how things really are.”

“But they want numbers for when Joe Resident asks for example, ‘What is the council doing about the state of the bin collections then?” that they have something they can give him to show him how well we are doing”

“If he is asking, it is because he has a concern, and telling him that everything is fine won’t work. He is receiving a service. He knows better than anyone what it is like. If they used measures derived from the work, showing the natural variation of the process, they’d see and understand the service as it actually is, and be able to use it to improve the bin collections.”

“But that’s not going to put off Joe Resident, giving him the actual numbers, it would just look worse for the council. You need measures to demonstrate how well you are doing. Not for people to pick fault.”

“With a better service you wouldn’t need to ‘demonstrate’ anything. It would just BE better, and that Joe Resident wouldn’t be ringing up in the first place”

“Well they don’t want those complicated graphs,  you can’t go sticking  a load of   those  in a report. You can’t send them to a  resident  or to Cabinet. They won’t understand that stuff, you need   a scorecard highlighting areas of over and under performance, using traffic light symbols so you can put the performance indicators that aren’t hitting target in an exception report. “

 “The thing is when you start looking at the work, you see that the measures don’t tell you anything about how things really are.”

desk

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This entry was posted in command and control, systems thinking, thinking, very short posts. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to A circular argument

  1. Maz Iqbal says:

    My friend, you have written another great post. Thank you. I look forward to your next piece of wisdom. Until then be well. And I wish you a great weekend.

    At your service / with my love
    maz

    Like

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